Extract from the Reply of the Greek Government to President Wilson's Peace Note, January 16, 1917

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WWI Document Archive > 1916 Documents > Official Communications and Speeches Relating to Peace Proposals 1916-1917 > Extract from the Reply of the Greek Government to President Wilson's Peace Note, January 16, 1917


Extract from the Reply of the Greek Government to President Wilson's Peace Note, January 16, 19171

     The Royal Government learns with the most lively interest of the
steps which the President of the United States of America has just
undertaken among the belligerents for the cessation of a long and
cruel war which is ravishing humanity. Very sensitive to the com-
munication made to it, the Royal Government deeply appreciates the
generous courage as well as the extremely humanitarian and pro-
foundly politic spirit which dictated that suggestion. The considera-
tions given in it to the subject of the sufferings of neutral nations as
a result of the colossal struggle, as well as guarantees which will
be equally desired by both belligerent factions for the rights and
privileges of all States, have particularly found a sympathetic echo
in the soul of Greece. In fact, there is no country which, like Greece,
has had to suffer from this war, while at the same time remaining
a stranger to it.
     Through circumstances exceptionally tragic, she has less than other
neutral countries been able to escape a direct and pernicious effect
from the hostilities between the belligerents. Her geographical posi-
tion contributed toward diminishing her power of resistance against
violations of her neutrality and sovereignty, which she has been forced
to submit to in the interest of self-preservation.
     The Royal Government would certainly have made all haste to
accede to the noble demand of the President of the United States of
America, to help with all means in its power until success were
achieved, if it were not entirely out of communication with one of
the two belligerents, while toward the other it must await the solution
of difficulties which seriously weigh upon the situation in Greece. But
the Royal Government is following with all the intensity of its soul
the precious effort of the President of the United States of America,
hoping to see it completed at the earliest possible moment.


1The New York Times, January 17, 1917. For the reply of King Constantine, see ante, p. 42.