Extracts from the Austro-Hungarian Note to Neutral Powers relative to the Entente Reply to the Peace Proposals, January 11, 1917

From World War I Document Archive
Jump to: navigation, search

WWI Document Archive > 1916 Documents > Official Communications and Speeches Relating to Peace Proposals 1916-1917 > Extracts from the Austro-Hungarian Note to Neutral Powers relative to the Entente Reply to the Peace Proposals, January 11, 1917


Extracts from the Austro-Hungarian Note to Neutral Powers relative to the Entente Reply to the Peace Proposals, January 11, 19171

     In the years preceding the Austro-Hungarian ultimatum to Serbia
the Monarchy displayed sufficient proof of its forbearance toward
the ever-increasing hostility, aggressive intentions, and intrigues of
Serbia until the moment when finally the notorious murders at Sera-
jevo made further indulgence impossible.

                              *     *     *     *     *     *     *     *
     The question as to on which side the military situation is the
stronger appears idle, and may confidently be left to the judgment of
the world. The four allied powers now look on their purely defen-
sive war aims as attained, while their enemies travel further and
further from the realization of their plans.
     For the enemy to characterize our peace proposals as meaningless
before peace negotiations were begun, and so long as, therefore, our
peace conditions are unknown, is merely to make an arbitrary as-
sertion. We had made full preparations for the acceptance of our
offer to make known our peace conditions on entering into the ne-
gotiations. We declared ourselves ready to end the war by a ver-
bal exchange of views with the enemy Governments, and it depended
solely on our enemies' decision whether peace were brought about or
not.
     Before God and mankind we repudiate responsibility for continu-
ance of the war.


1The New York Times, January 13, 1917